The Possibility to Construct a Graser – High Sensitivity Gravitational Wave Detector by Using the Electrogravitic Property of Dielectric Materials

ISSN: 1877-6116 (Online)
ISSN: 2210-6871 (Print)


Volume 4, 2 Issues, 2014


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The Possibility to Construct a Graser – High Sensitivity Gravitational Wave Detector by Using the Electrogravitic Property of Dielectric Materials

Author(s): Takaaki Musha

Affiliation: Advanced Science- Technology Research Organization, 3-11-7-601, Namiki, Kanazawa-ku Yokohama 236-0005, Japan.

Abstract

Astronomers tried to detect gravitational waves, which are generated by the movement of massive astronomical bodies. However, it is very difficult to detect gravity waves by using conventional devices. Leon Brillouin proposed a concept of Graser, that is a powerful amplifying device for gravity waves, which can enable us to measure gravity waves, their frequencies, their velocities, and how they propagate. According to the theory by Boyko Ivanov, the gravitational field can be induced by an external electric field for a dielectric material. By studying Ivanov’s formulas, the author has obtained the result that a gravitational wave detector consisting of a dielectric material, which has a higher sensitivity and a smaller size compared with the conventional gravitational detector, can be constructed.

Keywords: Graser, Gravitational waves, Pulsar, Electrogravitics, Dielectric material, Biefeld-Brown effect.

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Article Details

Volume: 3
Issue Number: 2
First Page: 152
Last Page: 157
Page Count: 6
DOI: 10.2174/1877611611303020006
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