Foot Injuries Among Hajj Pilgrims with and Without Diabetes Mellitus: Implications for Infection Management

ISSN: 2212-3989 (Online)
ISSN: 1871-5265 (Print)


Volume 14, 3 Issues, 2014


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Infectious Disorders - Drug Targets

Formerly: Current Drug Targets - Infectious Disorders

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Editor-in-Chief:
Jean-Marc Sabatier
Laboratoire ERT 62 'Ingénierie des peptides à visée thérapeutique'
Université de la Méditerranée
Faculté de Médecine Nord
Boulevard Pierre Dramard
13916 - MARSEILLE, Cedex 20
France


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Foot Injuries Among Hajj Pilgrims with and Without Diabetes Mellitus: Implications for Infection Management

Author(s): Mohammad Alfelali, Osamah Barasheed, Jassir Alshehri, Hamid Bokhary, Sami Alsaadi, Abdulrahman Alhamzi, Naji Aljohani, Tim Driscoll and Harunor Rashid on behalf of the diabetic foot care research team in Hajj

Affiliation: National Centre for ImmunisationResearch and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia

Abstract

Pilgrims attending Hajj in Makkah are at high risk of suffering from trauma and foot injury as they are required to make circuits barefooted on scorching marbles around the Holy Mosque, and march between two hillocks for long hours. No study has ever described the pattern of foot wounds among them. This observational study aimed to determine the spectrum of foot injuries among diabetic and non-diabetic Hajj pilgrims and the preventive measures adopted by them. Pilgrims who attended the Hajj 2013 and sought medical care for foot wounds at mobile podiatric clinics in Mina during the peak days of Hajj were invited to participate in the study and fill out a questionnaire while they were serviced. Podiatric carers noted down the significant signs of foot injuries. Out of 197 pilgrims from 21 different countries who participated in this study, 60 (31%) were diabetic. The two most common injuries observed were blisters (34%) and erythema (25%). Both diabetic and non-diabetic Hajj pilgrims were at high risk of developing infectious wounds, however a significantly higher proportion of diabetic pilgrims had callosities. Use of appropriately fitting protective footwear, and regularity in diets and drugs are highly recommended for pilgrims’ optimum foot care. Tailored educational advice on foot hygiene before and during travel could be beneficial for Hajj pilgrims


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Article Details

Volume: 14
First Page: 1
Page Count: 1
DOI: 10.2174/1871526514666140713160413
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