Therapeutical Potential of CB<sub>2</sub> Receptors in Immune-Related Diseases

ISSN: 1874-4702 (Online)
ISSN: 1874-4672 (Print)


Volume 7, 2 Issues, 2014


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Current Molecular Pharmacology

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Therapeutical Potential of CB2 Receptors in Immune-Related Diseases

Author(s): Natascha Leleu-Chavain, Pierre Desreumaux, Philippe Chavatte and Regis Millet

Affiliation: Universite du Droit et de la Sante de Lille, EA 4481, Institut de Chimie Pharmaceutique Albert Lespagnol, 3 rue du Pr. Laguesse, B.P. 83, F-59006 Lille, France.

Abstract

The cannabinoid receptor CB2 is highly expressed in immune cells suggesting an important role in numerous diseases such as inflammation, cancer, osteoporosis and liver diseases relating to modulation of the immune system. As a consequence, activation of receptor CB2 is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of a large range of diseases. Indeed, selective CB2 agonists display beneficial anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antifibrogenic properties and positive effects on liver disease and osteoporosis. This article reviews the CB2 involvement in the immune system and the promising therapeutical potential of selective CB2 agonists in the treatment of several immune-related diseases.

Keywords: Analgesic, anticancer, antifibrogenic, anti-inflammatory, cannabinoid receptors, CB2 agonists, immune system, immune-related diseases, liver disease, osteoporosis.

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Article Details

Volume: 6
Issue Number: 3
First Page: 183
Last Page: 203
Page Count: 21
DOI: 10.2174/1874467207666140219122337
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