Inhaled Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of COPD

ISSN: 1875-533X (Online)
ISSN: 0929-8673 (Print)


Volume 21, 38 Issues, 2014


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Inhaled Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of COPD

Author(s): P. Montuschi, F. Macagno, S. Valente and L. Fuso

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Largo Francesco Vito, 1 00168 Rome, Italy

Abstract

Bronchodilators, generally administered via metered dose or dry powder inhalers, are the mainstays of pharmacological treatment of stable COPD. Inhaled long-acting beta-agonists (LABA) and anticholinergics are the bronchodilators primarily used in the chronic treatment of COPD. Anticholinergics act as muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and are frequently preferred over betaagonists for their minimal cardiac stimulatory effects and greater efficacy in most studies. Their therapeutic efficacy is based on the fact that vagally mediated bronchoconstriction is the major reversible component of airflow obstruction in patients with COPD. However, bronchodilators are effective only on the reversible component of airflow obstruction, which by definition is limited, as COPD is characterized by a fixed or poorly reversible airflow obstruction. Inhaled anticholinergic antimuscarinic drugs approved for the treatment of COPD include ipratropium bromide, oxitropium bromide and tiotropium bromide. Ipratropium bromide, the prototype of anticholinergic bronchodilators, is a short-acting agent. Oxitropium bromide is administered twice a day. Tiotropium bromide, the only long-acting antimuscarinic agent (LAMA) currently approved, is administered once a day. Newer LAMAs including aclidinium bromide and glycopyrrolate bromide are currently in phase III development for treatment of COPD. Some new LAMAs, including glycocpyrrolate, are suitable for once daily administration and, unlike tiotropium, have a rapid onset of action. New LAMAs and their combination with ultra-LABA and, possibly, inhaled corticosteroids, seem to open new perspectives in the management of COPD. Dualpharmacology muscarinic antagonist-beta2 agonist (MABA) molecules present a novel approach to the treatment of COPD by combining muscarinic antagonism and beta2 agonism in a single molecule.

Keywords: Inhaled anticholinergic antimuscarinic drugs, muscarinic receptors, inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, tiotropium bromide, ipratropium bromide, long-acting antimuscarinic agents, long-acting beta-agonists, inhaled corticosteroids, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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Article Details

Volume: 19
First Page: 1
Last Page: 11
Page Count: 11
DOI:
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