Apoptosis-related BCL2-family Members: Key Players in Chemotherapy

ISSN: 1875-5992 (Online)
ISSN: 1871-5206 (Print)


Volume 14, 10 Issues, 2014


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Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry

Formerly: Current Medicinal Chemistry - Anti-Cancer Agents

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  • 85th of 202 in Oncology

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Editor-in-Chief:
Michelle Prudhomme
Universite Blaise Pascal - C.N.R.S
Aubiere Cedex
France


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Apoptosis-related BCL2-family Members: Key Players in Chemotherapy

Author(s): Christos K. Kontos, Maria-Ioanna Christodoulou and Andreas Scorilas

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Athens 15701, Greece.

Abstract

Classical chemotherapeutic agents such as mitotic inhibitors (spindle poisons), alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, and anthracenediones (anthracyclines) inhibit DNA synthesis and mitosis, thereby killing or impeding the proliferation of rapidly dividing cells. During the last decade, targeted therapy has gained advantage over conventional treatment regimens, as it is more effective against cancer and also much less harmful to normal cells, thus minimizing the side-effects of chemotherapy. This type of treatment blocks the proliferation of cancer cells by inhibiting the function of specific targeted molecules needed for tumor growth and metastasis. Targeted therapy agents include monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors, which most commonly target receptor and/or non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Most members of the BCL2 apoptosis-related family regulate cellular fate as a response to antineoplastic agents. Modulations at the mRNA and protein levels of these genes are usually associated with sensitivity or resistance of various types of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Moreover, alterations in expression of BCL2-family members, induced by anticancer drug treatment, can trigger or simply facilitate apoptosis. In this review, we summarize information about changes in apoptosis-related gene expression caused directly or indirectly by antineoplastic agents, as well as about the impact of BCL2-family members on the chemosensitivity or chemoresistance of cancer cells.

Keywords: Anticancer agents, antineoplastic agents, chemotherapeutic drugs, molecular tumor markers, monoclonal antibody therapy, targeted therapy.

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Article Details

Volume: 14
Issue Number: 3
First Page: 353
Last Page: 374
Page Count: 22
DOI: 10.2174/18715206113139990091
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